http://wordpress.karstens.eu/wp-content/themes/press

27 Oct 2010, Posted by Eric Karstens in European Policy, Internet, Media Policy, 0 Comments

The EU’s Digital Agenda (part II): Megalomania or Jack of all Trades?


What Europe is still missing is a substantial intellectual debate about the Digital Agenda and its implications for civil society and politics. Europe dearly needs innovative and groundbreaking outside-the-box-yet-pragmatic thinking at the interface between technology and the public sphere.

Continue Reading...

20 Oct 2010, Posted by Eric Karstens in European Policy, Internet, Media Policy, 0 Comments

The EU’s Digital Agenda (part I): What is at stake?


Across all the application areas of the EU’s Digital Agenda policy there are several common and mutually interdependent issues which need to be tackled irrespective of the specific purpose of a technological solution. This is why I first take a look at some of the most important overarching issues at stake. Political analysis will follow in part II.

Continue Reading...

05 Aug 2010, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, Television, 0 Comments

Eine kurze Geschichte des Privatfernsehens in Deutschland


Das Privatfernsehen in Deutschland entstand in den 1980er Jahren aus einer historisch gewachsenen Mischung wirtschaftlicher Interessen mit politischen Wunschvorstellungen. Als es endlich soweit war, rieb sich das Establishment angesichts des tatsächlichen Programmangebots verwundert die Augen.

Continue Reading...

28 Mar 2010, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, 0 Comments

German politicians discuss regulations for TV in the Internet era


It rarely happens anymore that somebody suggests climate change could be a good thing. Yet at the annual conference of the German Association of State Media Authorities, it happened a lot, and for a reason.

Continue Reading...

22 Mar 2010, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, Television, 0 Comments

Micromanaging news on commercial TV?


News consumption is a function of the education level of a society and of citizens’ sense of ownership of the public sphere. Forcing media businesses to dangle news as a carrot in front of an apathetic audience will not help.

Continue Reading...

26 Oct 2009, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, 0 Comments

The Curriculum Trap: Future-proofing Youth Media and Education


On 15 and 16 October, 2009, the EJC hosted yet another conference in its Innovation series, titled “Innovations in Youth Media and Next Generation Classroom”, and I was kindly invited to moderate the Maastricht event. Here are some conclusions I drew.

Continue Reading...

26 Aug 2009, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, 0 Comments

Gamescom 2009: Instant everything and the addictive potential of marriage


About 400 of the older guests (including myself) of the Gamescom trade fair convened on 20 August at a one-day Gamescom Congress to listen to politicians, regulators and academics trying to come to grips with the gaming phenomenon.

Continue Reading...

15 Aug 2009, Posted by Eric Karstens in European Policy, Media Policy, 0 Comments

Pluralismus-Algebra. Eine EU-Studie will die Informations- und Angebotsvielfalt der Medien messen


Nicht weniger als eine innovative Grundlage für die Medienregulierung erwartete die Europäische Kommission von ihrem “Media Pluralism Monitor”. Das Ziel der Übung besteht darin, einen EU-weit einheitlichen Maßstab für das Konzept des Medienpluralismus zu entwickeln.

Continue Reading...

18 Jun 2009, Posted by Eric Karstens in Media Policy, 0 Comments

Media Pluralism Monitor Unveiled


How – if at all – is it possible to objectively measure media pluralism? The new Media Pluralism Monitor has developed a set of criteria sufficiently universal to be applied to all 27 different media landscapes in the European Union.

Continue Reading...

23 Jul 2008, Posted by Eric Karstens in Internet, Media Policy, 0 Comments

New media and social change in the Arab and Muslim world


On 16 June, 2008, the Centre for Arab and Muslim Media Research (CAMMRO) held its fouth annual conference at the King’s College in London. What became very clear during the day is how deeply the emergent transnational satellite television channels and the Internet affect politics, the public sphere, and the daily lives of the peoples concerned.

Continue Reading...